Holy Hill, in Hubertus, Wisconsin.
(picture source, via the Journal Sentinel)

Holy Hill, in Hubertus, Wisconsin.

(picture source, via the Journal Sentinel)

The Isolator, invented in the 1920s. It’s described here as follows:

The invention was meant to give the wearer full isolation and, by wearing “The Insolator”, they could fully concentrate at the task at hand. Obviously not for the faint of heart or those prone to claustrophobia, the helmet even had an oxygen tube attached so the person could breathe. Once a person put this helmet over their head, they were complete cut off from sound which, by the inventor’s reasoning, would make the wearer able to concentrate better. The small eye slits stopped eyes from wandering anywhere but one what was right in front of them.

It’s a wonder it didn’t catch on…..
(picture source)

The Isolator, invented in the 1920s. It’s described here as follows:

The invention was meant to give the wearer full isolation and, by wearing “The Insolator”, they could fully concentrate at the task at hand. Obviously not for the faint of heart or those prone to claustrophobia, the helmet even had an oxygen tube attached so the person could breathe. Once a person put this helmet over their head, they were complete cut off from sound which, by the inventor’s reasoning, would make the wearer able to concentrate better. The small eye slits stopped eyes from wandering anywhere but one what was right in front of them.

It’s a wonder it didn’t catch on…..

(picture source)

Ice cream shop menu from February 1938.
The prices look great, but according to this site, in 1938, the average annual salary was $1,700, a house cost $6,400, a gallon of gas was 20 cents, and a loaf of bread was 9 cents, so a milk shake had to be a huge treat.
I also love the flavors: licorice ice cream? And plum pudding? And as near as I can figure, it looks like "Whitehouse" ice cream was vanilla ice cream with chunks of cherries in it.
(picture source)

Ice cream shop menu from February 1938.

The prices look great, but according to this site, in 1938, the average annual salary was $1,700, a house cost $6,400, a gallon of gas was 20 cents, and a loaf of bread was 9 cents, so a milk shake had to be a huge treat.

I also love the flavors: licorice ice cream? And plum pudding? And as near as I can figure, it looks like "Whitehouse" ice cream was vanilla ice cream with chunks of cherries in it.

(picture source)

Operator, can you help me place this call?
(photo in the Pacific Telephone Building, March 1957, from here)

Operator, can you help me place this call?

(photo in the Pacific Telephone Building, March 1957, from here)

our-amazing-world:

Autumn Lake, Quebec, Amazing World beautiful amazing

our-amazing-world:

Autumn Lake, Quebec, Amazing World beautiful amazing

(via harvestheart)

fladner:

beatnikdaddio:

you couldn’t handle those stairs on strong acid, man.

I couldn’t handle the whole room without strong acid.

The whole place just makes me itch…..

fladner:

beatnikdaddio:

you couldn’t handle those stairs on strong acid, man.

I couldn’t handle the whole room without strong acid.

The whole place just makes me itch…..

natgeotravel:

Grab a seat and watch the sunset on Ochheuteal Beach in Cambodia.
Photograph by Kris LeBoutillier

natgeotravel:

Grab a seat and watch the sunset on Ochheuteal Beach in Cambodia.

Photograph by Kris LeBoutillier

It was hard for early naturalists to imagine that the passenger pigeon could ever become extinct. But they didn’t realize that a technological revolution was about to hit.

"The telegraph allowed word to go out: ‘The pigeons are here,’" says David Blockstein, a senior scientist at the National Council for Science and the Environment and a founder of Project Passenger Pigeon. Thousands of hunters would then jump on newly built trains to ride out to wherever the pigeons had settled and start slaughtering them.

The hunters weren’t just killing the birds to feed their families, however. Pigeons would be stuffed into barrels and loaded back onto the trains, which would deliver them to distant cities, where they’d be sold everywhere from open air markets to fine restaurants. “Technology enabled the market,” says Blockstein.

Soon this technology-driven slaughter was decimating the passenger pigeon. Its decline was so worrisome that Congress passed the Lacey Act, one of the first laws to protect wildlife in the United States. The Lacey Act would eventually help protect many species, but for the passenger pigeon it came too late.

In 1900, the year in which the act was made into law, naturalists spotted a single wild passenger pigeon in Ohio. They never saw another one in the wild again.

For the next 14 years, the species clung to existence in a few zoos. But the birds proved to be poor breeders in captivity. Martha, the last of her kind, was barren.

Century After Extinction, Passenger Pigeons Remain Iconic—And Scientists Hope to Bring Them Back (via dendroica)

The last line of the click-through - “and scientist hope to bring them back.” - brings one thought to my mind:

"Didn’t we learn anything from Jurassic Park?"

(via dendroica)